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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
analyst jim walsh joins me here in a very chilly boston at this hour. gentlemen, we've been talking about this, you know, off and on this evening about the fbi. whether they dropped the ball. and a lot of monday morning quarterbacking going on. lou, to you in new york. it's too soon to tell, but there was certainly -- the fbi will certainly have to answer some questions after the older brother took a trip to russia and no one really followed up on that, lou. >> yes, i agree with you, don. i think there are some questions that need to be answered in the proper forum. i do think director muller and administrators of the fbi that had knowledge of the heads up they received from the russian government, sfb, their intelligence group, they'll have to explain exactly what transpired here and answer as to why they did or didn't do things. >> jim, it is bloelieved, everye has said they believe the brothers acted alone. is it too soon to tell? considering as much firepower they had and how some people thought they planned this out. >> yes. >> could there be someone else out there? >> i'm glad you a
analyst mr. jim walsh. he joins me here in boston. >> cold boston. >> everyone is asking me, is it that cold in boston? it is. >> you're clearly not a native new englander. you picked a bad spot. >> we're in a wind tunnel. i'll ask you since we are here talking. did the fbi drop the ball in interviewing the older tsarnaev brother? >> i mean at a very simple level, based just on the outcome you would have to say yes. he interviewed him and he went on to commit an act. but i don't think we have the full answer here yet. what was the process that they followed? the fbi interviews a ton of folks every year. only a fraction of which are actually dangerous. they interview me when i go to aroon and north korea and come back. but obviously either they -- he fell through the cracks or at the time that they were interviewing him they weren't giving him anything actionable to continue his case. >> but, lou, he did visit russia, stayed there for six months. you feel the fbi dropped the ball? >> i'm not going to rush to judgment on this. i think we're going to have hearings where directo
't thinking about the potential of the good guys to find out what happened. your thoughts first, jim? >> well, you're exactly right. it's like behind you in these big cases, there's a silent worrying fan that starts and that state department agents across the globe, cia stations, homeland security, where governor ridge was in charge of, they all start worrying around and they're all supporting you with their databases and their information. in the command post, we have computerized lead tracking. atf and fbi developed those systems in the early '90s and we put them to work with great force. i mean, we track every lead. computerized lead tracking so we can capture that information and control the leads. and this digital age that's come upon us, chris, when i started as a policeman, we had rotary phones. i mean, you're talking about wanted posters. we had to go hand them out. >> i know. >> so now -- this digital phone technology, this surveillance cameras. remember the london train bombings? the cct cameras in greater london. the metropolitan police were able to capture the suicide bombers on t
. people say all the time, you look sort of like that guy, like that guy. let's go to jim cavanaugh right now. maybe i think like a cop but i'm thinking monday night they could have had plane tickets to be out of the country, middle east, driven to the canadian border, been to new york by monday at midnight. there's so many possibilities of where they've gone. what does it tell you that the fbi gave up trying to find them on their own? >> they made the right decision, the task force did to release them. you always want to be able to identify them yourself because then you can put them under surveillance, see their behavior, and make their move when you want to. that's what we all prefer in law enforcement. in law enforcement, we don't want to tell anybody anything. that's not the way it can work. and you're exactly right. mike isikoff, who i think is always right, you're exactly right about coming and going. look, if these were foreign nationals, they could have come in to watch the marathon or even if they were domestic perpetrators, they could have come in to watch the marathon for two,
. >> chris? >> thank you very much. i'm here talking with steven and jim. you're there, you were there to help the elite athletes, thinking you're going to deal with cramps and dehydration. what happened, steven? >> the first thing we heard was the explosion, then we felt the concussion in the room. then several of us went running towards the front door. then we heard the second explosion, and then two or three of us kept going. and then the group kept going back, waiting for the casualties. so half of us went forward to the wounded and half stayed back. >> jim, what do you see when you get to the casualties? >> lots of smoke and confusion, lots of blood. lots of injured patients. for me, it was just a flashback to iraq. carrying that first explosion, i knew it was an ied. usually they come in twos, sometimes threes. sometimes they wait for people to come out and they set off the third one or the second one. there were two. they stopped the third one, thankfully. and we had to make room in the medical tent from the athletes, the marathoners, to move forward to make room for the i
, live in boston and jim cavanaugh, former atf special agent who led the investigations in to the atlanta olympic bombing and don clark, former agent in charge in houston. michael, let me go to you first. what jumps out at you from the fbi complaint filed today? >> reporter: well, actually, the passage describing the carjacking, a rather chilling account from the victim in which he was -- in which he describes being in his car on a road in cambridge, one of the tsarnaev brothers, the affidavit is not clear which one, knocks on the window, he rolls down the window, that tsarnaev opens the door, gets in, brand dishes his gun, says did you hear about the boston explosion and then adds, i did that. a boast that he was the bomber and then shows him his gun, taking out the magazine, shows the bullet in it, puts the magazine back in and says, i'm serious. he then orders the carjacker to drive him to an atm machine, also to pick up his brother, then take over the car and eventually the car -- the victim is able to escape but that boast, i did that, was one of the more powerful elements in the com
wants a review by the intelligence committee. jim acosta joins us now from capitol hill. jim, what did she say exactly? >> well, anderson, senator feinstein, who is the chair of the senate intelligence committee, she did not say that the fbi dropped the ball. she didn't want to go that far, but she does want a review of what the fbi knows about all this and to get at what tamerlan tsarnaev was up to when he went back to russia back in 2012. he apparently made a trip there. and this was after he was apparently interviewed by the fbi back in 2011. the fbi said in a statement friday night that it had been asked to investigate tamerlan's ties to potential terror groups, to potential militant groups and that during that inquiry the fbi interviewed tamerlan. and so senator feinstein and some other senators here on capitol hill want to know how is it that tamerlan tsarnaev was able to travel to russia last year for six months and how did he get back into the country given all of that information? and so senator feinstein says there will be a hearing on this perhaps as early as tomorrow to get
with these two, seems to be it happened here. >> i want to bring in jim walsh now. he's a professor at m.i.t. you know, your office, jim, is right next to where this went down last night as we were watching building 32 at that time, we had absolutely no idea -- no one had any idea that this would be linked to the two brothers of the boston marathon bombing. >>> what is it like on campus right now? it must have been a real shock. >> well, certainly, to put this into some context, i went to bed last night having learned from m.i.t. that a person who works where i work, was slain, and then i woke up this morning, one street over from watertown, massachusetts, the middle class suburb next to cambridge, across the river from boston, to the sound of helicopters and sirens and instructions to keep our doors locked. i have since traveled -- i'm not on campus now, i'm at a studio here in watertown, which is ground zero for the police outside. there are more than a dozen satellite trucks. as i was pulling up, they stopped my car. i let them do their business. they were going house-by-house, checking the sm
know, it's logical to think that this 19-year-old may have been hit, too. so i agree with jim, he could have crawled under some place and laying there bleeding out. he could be holding a gun to someone's head and they wouldn't have answered the door. there's a lot of scenarios. the best case scenario is that we would have found him holed up someplace in that 20-block area. realize, not only did they have s.w.a.t. agents, everybody else, bomb dogs out there, they had search dogs out there, they had a lot of resources and this guy, 19 years old, on the run and in an environment he doesn't know with just the shoes on his feet maybe has been able to elude. now, that's probably very lucky on his part but law enforcement sitting there right now with their fingers crossed hoping he's still in the area because they may not know where to look next, al. >> that's my point, james. lucky for him maybe. hopefully he doesn't have that luck. but scary for others. i mean, i'm an early riser. i wake up early this morning, 5:00 a.m., in the middle of the night both of them have been caught, one's dead, t
. and joining me is security analyst jim walsh, should credit be given to social media for identifying the men so quickly? >> well, yes, we document things all of the time and it is going to be bigger and not smaller going forward. and today, what were some of the sources for the new information about the suspects? it was youtube and twitter and other postings so it is here to stay. >> and people are taking pictures at the finish line and that is what they are doing, and look, i ran the marathon and my cousin or buddy and then posting them everywhere. how do the authorities go about piecing the images together? >> well, first of all, they are looking for a time sequence and looking for moment of explosion to the corralled moment there and preceding time and it is temporal, and this is a proceeding that believe it or not technology and techniques and training that have been developed in the department of defense and elsewhere we have 24-hour surveillance from a drone or other data source capturing modes. all of it is moving lightning speed, but it is the future, and the future is now and we wil
and expert jim walsh. good to have you here. >> good to be with you. >> first of all, have you ever seen anything like this in a major metropolitan city in america? >> first of all, i've never seen anything like it at all. and in particular how it is touching various parts of my life. yesterday i taught my class at m.i.t. from 1:00 to 3:00, you know, hung out at my office, made my way home, only to see on the news that two blocks from my office a person who workeds for the same place i do, m.i.t., had been assassinated. i woke up this morning, to the sound of helicopters. i live -- i live on the watertown border. i woke up, my phone is ringing off the hook, i drive to watertown. blocks from where a reporter is, that's where my studio is. and streets are blocked off. the streets are empty. there were national guard, tactical police, state police, lots of media satellite trucks, i go into the studio like i always do and lock the door, right, because we're all on lockdown now. and then began to talk to your colleagues and then i received a phone call from my daughter. and my daughter who gr
your bank of america stock or selling it? here to discuss this, jim senegal, financial services analyst from "morningstar". thank you for joining us. what do you think of the report in the first place? banks manipulate the numbers for instance, moving loan-loss reserves over to the balance sheet. other banks have done that. can we believe numbers and are banks worse perhaps than we believe with bank of america? >> bank of america did release some reserves. that is something all the banks are doing. it is something i don't think a lot of investors look at. there is some help to the bottom line there. other than that it was a pretty clean quarter, asking considering all of the unusual charges for bank of america has had in the past few years. i think the problem is, the earnings really aren't anything to get excited about. even though bank of america's problems are receding into the past they're still not making a lot of money and a lot of that has to do with the macroeconomic environment. adam: when you talk about problems receding into the past, the big problem would be countrywide. i t
. >> now the man you saw standing next to steve, his name is jim. he actually was a trauma nurse in iraq for 18 months. and he said all of those skills that he learned in iraq he used yesterday in boston. john? >> they treated scores of people. they saved, no doubt, scores of people. but they also, elizabeth, watched people die. >> they did. they did watch people die. and so steve who we just heard from, he told me the story one of the first patients he worked on was a young woman. he remembers her, blonde hair, blue eyes, maybe about 20 years old. sh came in and, you know, her leg was broken. her abdomen was open due to the explosion. she wasn't breathing. they gave her cpr. they tried over and over again. they just didn't have a pulse. he said when they were treating her after she passed away, they looked around for some kind of identification in her pockets but he said as far as he knew they just didn't know -- still couldn't figure out who she was. >> so sad. as we said, there are a number of people still in the hospital this morning. 17 in critical condition, 20 in serious condition
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)